Other Vespers clips

31 July, 2009

The Deacon chanting the Trisagion Prayers.

+Holy God, Holy Mighty, Holy Immortal: have mercy on us.
+Holy God, Holy Mighty, Holy Immortal: have mercy on us.
+Holy God, Holy Mighty, Holy Immortal: have mercy on us.

+Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit, both now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.

All-Holy Trinity, have mercy on us. Lord, cleanse us from our sins. Master, pardon our iniquities. Holy God, visit and heal our infirmities for Thy name’s sake.

Lord, have mercy.
Lord, have mercy.
Lord, have mercy.

+Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit, both now and ever, and unto the ages of ages.

Our Father, who art in Heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy Kingdom come, Thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread, and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from the evil one.

For Thine is the Kingdom, and the power, and the glory, of the +Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, now and ever and unto ages of ages. Amen.

At the Lighting of the Lamps, one of the oldest Christian hymns, older than much of the New Testament, O Gladsome Light (Phos hilaron, Byzantine setting).

O Gladsome Light of the holy glory of the Immortal Father, heavenly, holy, blessed Jesus Christ.

Now we have come to the setting of the sun and behold the light of evening, we praise God: +Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

For it is right at all times to worship Thee with voices of praise, O Son of God and Giver of Life.

Therefore all the world glorifies Thee.

The Aposticha, Russian Common Chant (Obikhod).


My First Attempt

30 July, 2009

From last night’s Vespers. There were four of us at the kliros, two tenors and two basses. Psalms and stichera.

Psalm 140 (141), “Lord I Call Upon Thee,” is Kievan. The stichera, with moving ison (no, I am not the chanter; I’m singing ison) are Russian Common Chant, popularly misnamed Obikhod. The bells, of course, are on the censor. By the way, the only music we had for this was Psalm 140. For the stichera, all we have are pointed texts and the tone (mode) for the week.

I finally gave up on audacity. I found I could cut up the audio file with Boisoft video splitter. And no, I have no idea what happened to the graphic. Ask Windows Movie Maker.


First kathisma from Saturday evening Great Vespers

20 July, 2009

Homophonic Orthodox music at its best. Simple — only 2 parts — and beautiful, this arrangement of the Antiphon of the First Kathisma sung at Saturday evening Great Vespers would be appropriate for any Christian service (and a Western choir could make this as long as necessary by adding psalm verses before the Glory). Traditionally, it’s sung antiphonally (back and forth between two choirs); in our parish, the chanter sings the verses and the choir sings the refrain (alleluia, alleluia, alleluia). The final alleluias are accompanied by deep bows, and should be sung with great reverence. Sorry, it’s Orthodox. No instrumental accompaniment exists.

Blessed is the man who walks not in the council of the wicked.

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia.

For the Lord knows the way of the righteous, but the way of the wicked will perish.

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia.

Serve the Lord with fear and rejoice in Him with trembling.

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia.

Blessed are all who take refuge in Him.

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia.

Arise, O Lord, save me, O my God.

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia.

Salvation belongs to the Lord, Thy blessing be upon Thy people.

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia.

+Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit.

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia.

+Now and forever, and unto ages of ages, amen.

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia.

+Allelluia, alleluia, alleluia, glory to Thee, O God!
+Allelluia, alleluia, alleluia, glory to Thee, O God!
+Allelluia, alleluia, alleluia, glory to Thee, O God!

You’ll find the music (pdf) here.


News

19 July, 2009

From (oddly enough) Orthodox England, by way of ROCOR United, is this.

As a result of a teleconference on 1 July, the Holy Synod of the Orthodox Church in America has divided its Washington and New York Diocese into two. This means that it has changed the title of its head, Metropolitan Jonah. He is now to be known as ‘Archbishop of Washington and Metropolitan of all America and Canada’.

This change means that there is now no overlap between Metropolitan Jonah’s title and that of Metropolitan Hilarion, First Hierarch of the Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia, Metropolitan of New York and Eastern America.

This appears to be the beginning of further profound transformations in the Orthodox Church landscape of North America and indeed worldwide. We remind readers that the former head of the parishes of the Moscow Patriarchate in North America, Archbishop Mercurius, was earlier this year removed to Moscow and has not been replaced.

Hmmmm. I’m not at all sure this means anything. We’ll see. And also via ROCOR United is this from Interfax.

The Union of Orthodox Church Banner-Bearers announced a contest for the project of a Church of New Russian Martyrs and Confessors in the Red Square to replace Lenin’s Mausoleum.

“Revival of Russia is impossible until the occult lab for destroying will and conscience of Russian people remains in the very heart of Moscow “the Third Rome.” To this end, the Mausoleum should be destructed, body of the world proletarian leader should be taken away, this place should be consecrated and an Orthodox Church should be constructed at this place,” the Union’s Head Leonid Simonovich-Nikshich has told an Interfax-Religion correspondent on Friday.

Look for Obama and the Democrats to oppose this if they hear about it.


Ancient Faith

17 July, 2009

Archbishop Elias and the monks of Balamand Monastery, the Magnificat from Matins, in Arabic and Greek.

My soul doth magnify the Lord, and my spirit hath rejoiced in God my Savior.

More honorable than the cherubim, and more glorious beyond compare than the seraphim, without corruption thou gavest birth to God the Word: true Theotokos, we magnify thee!

For He hath looked upon the lowliness of His handmaiden; for behold, henceforth all generations shall call me blessed.

More honorable than the cherubim, and more glorious beyond compare than the seraphim, without corruption thou gavest birth to God the Word: true Theotokos, we magnify thee!

For the Mighty One hath done great things to me, and holy is His name.
And His mercy is on those that fear Him from generation to generation.

More honorable than the cherubim, and more glorious beyond compare than the seraphim, without corruption thou gavest birth to God the Word: true Theotokos, we magnify thee!

He hath shown strength with His arm; he hath scattered the proud in the imagination of their heart.

More honorable than the cherubim, and more glorious beyond compare than the seraphim, without corruption thou gavest birth to God the Word: true Theotokos, we magnify thee!

He hath put down the mighty from their seat, and exalted them of low degree. He hath filled the hungry with good things, and the rich He hath sent away empty.

More honorable than the cherubim, and more glorious beyond compare than the seraphim, without corruption thou gavest birth to God the Word: true Theotokos, we magnify thee!

He hath holpen His servant Israel in remembrance of His mercy, as He spake to our fathers, to Abraham and to his seed forever.

More honorable than the cherubim, and more glorious beyond compare than the seraphim, without corruption thou gavest birth to God the Word: true Theotokos, we magnify thee!


Welcome, and unexpected

16 July, 2009

Archimandrite Touma (Bitar) on Ecclesiology

I started this blog with the intention of never commenting on the current controversy in the Antiochian Archdiocese of North America. In fact, for geographical reasons I’ve never been a member of that diocese and so it’s hardly my place. The purpose of this blog is to increase awareness of the Arab heritage of the Orthodox Church among English speakers and hopefully to encourage love for our Arabic-speaking brethren in Christ. That said, I ran across the following comments by Archimandrite Touma (Bitar), abbot of the monastery of Saint Silouan at Douma and author of Forgotten Saints in the Antiochian Heritage, about the ecclesiological controversy which has lately flared up in the Church of Antioch. As readers of this blog might guess, I have great respect for Fr. Touma. His thoughts on the current crisis were posted on his website on July 12, and I have yet to find any notice of them on the anglophone Orthodox web. Since his words need to be heard, I will post my own translation of them here. Please, if anyone has any corrections to the translation, let me know in the comment box.

It’s well worth the read, and he addresses not only the scandal, but the OCA, and Orthodox unity in America.


Excellent advice

15 July, 2009

for those interested in Orthodoxy at Ad Orientem. The only thing I’d add is read Timothy Ware’s The Orthodox Church.